Introduction

Introduction
It’s normal for your child to sometimes react strongly, using his entire body to express his emotions. It’s because for him, these emotions are new.

Joy, sadness, anger, jealousy… In just a few short years, your child will have to learn how to deal with a panoply of emotions. What can you do to help?

When 3-year-old Arthur is frustrated, he throws things or launches himself onto the floor and stomps his feet. After a while, he’ll get up on his knees, cross his arms over his chest and pout. “There’s no point in trying to reason with him when he’s in the middle of a tantrum,” says his mom, Nathalie. “When he’s calmed down, I take him in my arms and we talk about what happened. I ask him how he could have expressed his anger differently.”

It’s normal for your child to sometimes react strongly, using his entire body to express his emotions. It’s because for him, these emotions are new. He must therefore learn how to react to them appropriately. As he gets older, he’ll learn to control himself and to put words to what he’s feeling, but this can take time.