Introduction

Introduction
She’ll play soccer, he’ll have a little sister to play with, we’ll go on family camping trips . . . All parents-to-be dream about their future child. But when a child is born with a disability or illness, or has a speech or developmental disorder, the family must adjust and learn to live with other people’s perceptions.
She’ll play soccer, he’ll have a little sister to play with, we’ll go on family camping trips… All parents-to-be dream about their future child. But when a child is born with a disability or illness, or has a speech or developmental disorder, the family must adjust and learn to live with other people’s perceptions.

In addition to the worry and anguish brought on by their child’s condition, parents have to deal with regular medical appointments, complicated forms, and a lack of resources. Some choose to work less or to leave their jobs altogether in order to care for their child, which can put a strain on finances. And, because children with disabilities require a lot of attention, couples wind up having less time for their other kids. In the end, every aspect of a family’s personal, social, and professional life comes to revolve around the needs of a single child.

But even this cloud has its silver lining. There are the small victories, protective siblings, amazing support networks—and, of course, oodles of love for this child and all the pride that comes with watching them grow and integrate into society!

To better understand what these families go through, we asked eight parents of special-needs children to tell us about one aspect of their lives. While each family’s experience is unique, the parents all have one thing in common: a devotion to ensuring the happiness and well-being of their child. Here are their stories.

Naitre et grandir.com

Source : Naître et grandir magazine, May–June 2017
Interviews by Kenza Bennis, Amélie Cournoyer, Julie Leduc, and Nathalie Vallerand

 

Photo : Maxim Morin