A real advantage for some children

A real advantage for some children
The benefits of quality childcare are even more apparent in children who receive little stimulation at home, or who have hard-to-manage behaviour.

The benefits of quality childcare are even more apparent in children who receive little stimulation at home, or who have hard-to-manage behaviour.

This is what Jessie, mother to Noah, Eli, Romy and Edith, observed. “My youngest daughter was constantly craving attention and often had strong reactions to a variety of situations. At the beginning, I didn’t believe things would go well at daycare. But the changes in her were impressive. The intensity of her reactions decreased enormously and she became more independent. Her educator doesn’t force her to do things, but instead encourages her to experiment and develop her skills.”

“Children who constantly seek attention and demonstrate difficult behaviour often need more time to adapt to new contexts,” explains Nathalie Bigras, an early childhood education professor at UQAM. When educators are able to adapt to each child’s individual needs in a positive manner, the group as a whole functions better.

Unfortunately, however, the most disadvantaged children often don’t attend educational daycares. Some parents who are unemployed hesitate putting their children into daycare because they think their infant will take the place of another child. For their part, parents who work sometimes form judgments against those who don’t. They don’t understand why these out-of-work parents would send their children to daycare, when they could take care of them during the day. The reality is that regardless of whether parents work or not, attending a quality daycare can make a real difference in a child’s development.